A multivariate model for successful publication of intensive care medicine randomized controlled trials in the highest impact factor journals : the SCOTI score Article - Novembre 2021

Joris Pensier, Audrey de Jong, Gerald Chanques, Emmanuel Futier, Elie Azoulay, Nicolas Molinari, Samir Jaber

Joris Pensier, Audrey de Jong, Gerald Chanques, Emmanuel Futier, Elie Azoulay, Nicolas Molinari, Samir Jaber, « A multivariate model for successful publication of intensive care medicine randomized controlled trials in the highest impact factor journals : the SCOTI score  », Annals of Intensive Care, novembre 2021. ISSN 2110-5820

Abstract

Abstract Background Critical care randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are often published in high-impact journals, whether general journals [the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), The Lancet, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)] or critical care journals [Intensive Care Medicine (ICM), the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine (AJRCCM), Critical Care Medicine (CCM)]. As rejection occurs in up to 97% of cases, it might be appropriate to assess pre-submission probability of being published. The objective of this study was to develop and internally validate a simplified score predicting whether an ongoing trial stands a chance of being published in high-impact general journals. Methods A cohort of critical care RCTs published between 1999 and 2018 in the three highest impact medical journals (NEJM, The Lancet, JAMA) or the three highest impact critical care journals (ICM, AJRCCM, CCM) was split into two samples (derivation cohort, validation cohort) to develop and internally validate the simplified score. Primary outcome was journal of publication assessed as high-impact general journal (NEJM, The Lancet, JAMA) or critical care journal (ICM, AJRCCM, CCM). Results A total of 968 critical care RCTs were included in the predictive cohort and split into a derivation cohort ( n = 510) and a validation cohort ( n = 458). In the derivation cohort, the sample size ( P value < 0.001), the number of centers involved ( P value = 0.01), mortality as primary outcome ( P value = 0.002) or a composite item including mortality as primary outcome ( P value = 0.004), and topic [ventilation ( P value < 0.001) or miscellaneous ( P value < 0.001)] were independent factors predictive of publication in high-impact general journals, compared to high-impact critical care journals. The SCOTI score (Sample size, Centers, Outcome, Topic, and International score) was developed with an area under the ROC curve of 0.84 (95% Confidence Interval, 0.80–0.88) in validation by split sample. Conclusions The SCOTI score, developed and validated by split sample, accurately predicts the chances of a critical care RCT being published in high-impact general journals, compared to high-impact critical care journals.

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