Impact of clay mineral, wood sawdust or root organic matter on the bacterial and fungal community structures in two aged PAH-contaminated soils Article - Septembre 2015

Aurélie Cébron, Thierry Beguiristain, Jeanne Bongoua-Devisme, Jérémie Denonfoux, Pierre Faure, Catherine Lorgeoux, Stéphanie Ouvrard, Nicolas Parisot, Pierre Peyret, Corinne Leyval

Aurélie Cébron, Thierry Beguiristain, Jeanne Bongoua-Devisme, Jérémie Denonfoux, Pierre Faure, Catherine Lorgeoux, Stéphanie Ouvrard, Nicolas Parisot, Pierre Peyret, Corinne Leyval, « Impact of clay mineral, wood sawdust or root organic matter on the bacterial and fungal community structures in two aged PAH-contaminated soils  », Environmental Science and Pollution Research, septembre 2015, pp. 13724-13738. ISSN 0944-1344

Abstract

The high organic pollutant concentration of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated wasteland soils is highly recalcitrant to biodegradation due to its very low bioavailability. In such soils, the microbial community is well adapted to the pollution, but the microbial activity is limited by nutrient availability. Management strategies could be applied to modify the soil microbial functioning as well as the PAH contamination through various amendment types. The impact of amendment with clay minerals (montmorillonite), wood sawdust and organic matter plant roots on microbial community structure was investigated on two aged PAH-contaminated soils both in laboratory and 1-year on-site pot experiments. Total PAH content (sum of 16 PAHs of the US-EPA list) and polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (pPAC) were monitored as well as the available PAH fraction using the Tenax method. The bacterial and fungal community structures were monitored using fingerprinting thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) method. The abundance of bacteria (16S rRNA genes), fungi (18S rRNA genes) and PAH degraders (PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase and catechol dioxygenase genes) was followed through qPCR assays. Although the treatments did not modify the total and available PAH content, the microbial community density, structure and the PAH degradation potential changed when fresh organic matter was provided as sawdust and under rhizosphere influence, while the clay mineral only increased the percentage of catechol-1,2-dioxygenase genes. The abundance of bacteria and fungi and the percentage of fungi relative to bacteria were enhanced in soil samples supplemented with wood sawdust and in the plant rhizospheric soils. Two distinct fungal populations developed in the two soils supplemented with sawdust, i.e. fungi related to Chaetomium and Neurospora genera and Brachyconidiellopsis and Pseudallescheria genera, in H and NM soils respectively. Wood sawdust amendment favoured the development of PAH-degrading bacteria holding Gram-negative PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase, catechol-1,2-dioxygenase and catechol-2,3-dioxygenase genes. Regarding the total community structure, bacteria closely related to Thiobacillus (beta-Proteobacteria) and Steroidobacter (gamma-Proteobacteria) genera were favoured by wood sawdust amendment. In both soils, plant rhizospheres induced the development of fungi belonging to Ascomycota and related to Alternaria and Fusarium genera. Bacteria closely related to Luteolibacter (Verrucomicrobia) and Microbacterium (Actinobacteria) were favoured in alfalfa and ryegrass rhizosphere.

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