Impact of life stage-dependent dispersal on the colonization dynamics of host patches by ticks and tick-borne infectious agents Article - 2017

Sarah Kada, Karen Mccoy, Thierry Boulinier

Sarah Kada, Karen Mccoy, Thierry Boulinier, « Impact of life stage-dependent dispersal on the colonization dynamics of host patches by ticks and tick-borne infectious agents  », Parasites and Vectors, 2017, p. 375. ISSN 1756-3305

Abstract

Background : When colonization and gene flow depend on host-mediated dispersal, a key factor affecting vector dispersal potential is the time spent on the host for the blood meal, a characteristic that can vary strongly among life history stages. Using a 2-patch vector-pathogen population model and seabird ticks as biological examples, we explore how vector colonization rates and the spread of infectious agents may be shaped by life stage-dependent dispersal. We contrast hard (Ixodidae) and soft (Argasidae) tick systems, which differ strongly in blood-feeding traits.Results : We find that vector life history characteristics (i.e. length of blood meal) and demographic constraints (Allee effects) condition the colonization potential of ticks ; hard ticks, which take a single, long blood meal per life stage, should have much higher colonization rates than soft ticks, which take repeated short meals. Moreover, this dispersal potential has direct consequences for the spread of vector-borne infectious agents, in particular when transmission is transovarial.These results have clear implications for predicting the dynamics of vector and disease spread in the context of large-scale environmental change. The findings highlight the need to include life-stage dispersal in models that aim to predict species and disease distributions, and provide testable predictions related to the population genetic structure of vectors and pathogens along expansion fronts.

Voir la notice complète sur HAL

Actualités