New insights into sulfur metabolism in yeasts as revealed by studies of yarrowia lipolytica Article - 2013

Agnes Hebert, Marie-Pierre Forquin, Aurelie Roux, Julie Aubert, Christophe Junot, Jean-Francois Heilier, Sophie Landaud-Liautaud, Pascal Bonnarme, Jean Marie Beckerich

Agnes Hebert, Marie-Pierre Forquin, Aurelie Roux, Julie Aubert, Christophe Junot, Jean-Francois Heilier, Sophie Landaud-Liautaud, Pascal Bonnarme, Jean Marie Beckerich, « New insights into sulfur metabolism in yeasts as revealed by studies of yarrowia lipolytica  », Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2013, pp. 1200 - 1211. ISSN 0099-2240

Abstract

Yarrowia lipolytica, located at the frontier of hemiascomycetous yeasts and fungi, is an excellent candidate for studies of metabolism evolution. This yeast, widely recognized for its technological applications, in particular produces volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) that fully contribute to the flavor of smear cheese. We report here a relevant global vision of sulfur metabolism in Y. lipolytica based on a comparison between high-and low-sulfur source supplies (sulfate, methionine, or cystine) by combined approaches (transcriptomics, metabolite profiling, and VSC analysis). The strongest repression of the sulfate assimilation pathway was observed in the case of high methionine supply, together with a large accumulation of sulfur intermediates. A high sulfate supply seems to provoke considerable cellular stress via sulfite production, resulting in a decrease of the availability of the glutathione pathway’s sulfur intermediates. The most limited effect was observed for the cystine supply, suggesting that the intracellular cysteine level is more controlled than that of methionine and sulfate. Using a combination of metabolomic profiling and genetic experiments, we revealed taurine and hypotaurine metabolism in yeast for the first time. On the basis of a phylogenetic study, we then demonstrated that this pathway was lost by some of the hemiascomycetous yeasts during evolution.

Voir la notice complète sur HAL

Actualités