Present-day strain distribution across the Minab-Zendan-Palami fault system from dense GPS transects Article - 2009

Michel Peyret, Y. Djamour, K. Hessami, V. Regard, O. Bellier, Philippe Vernant, Marc Daignieres, H. Nankali, S. van Gorp, M. Goudarzi, Jean Chery, Roger Bayer, M. Rigoulay

Michel Peyret, Y. Djamour, K. Hessami, V. Regard, O. Bellier, Philippe Vernant, Marc Daignieres, H. Nankali, S. van Gorp, M. Goudarzi, Jean Chery, Roger Bayer, M. Rigoulay, « Present-day strain distribution across the Minab-Zendan-Palami fault system from dense GPS transects  », Geophysical Journal International, 2009, pp. 751-762. ISSN 0956-540X

Abstract

P>The Strait of Hormuz area is a transition zone between the continental collision of the Zagros (west) and the subduction of an oceanic part of the Arabian Plate beneath the Makran wedge (east). Geology and recent GPS measurements indicate that about 15 mm yr-1 of relative motion in N10 degrees E direction is accommodated by two major fault systems : (1) the NNW-trending Minab-Zendan-Palami (MZP) fault system that connects the Main Zagros Thrust (MZT) to the inner Makran thrust system and the Frontal subduction thrust and (2) the N-trending Sabzevaran-Kahnuj-Jiroft (SKJ) fault system that bounds the Jazmurian depression to the west. We use dense GPS measurements along four transects across these fault systems in order to determine the strains spatial distribution. The northern GPS transect confirms the total fault slip rates for both fault systems estimated by the tectonic analyses (about 10 and 7.3 mm yr-1 in N10 degrees direction across the MZP and SKJ fault systems, respectively). For both fault systems, the elastic deformation spreads over shear zones that are several tens of kilometres wide. However, transects located close to latitude 27 degrees N reveal a much narrower shear zone (similar to 10 km) for the MZP fault system. Moreover, we confirm that most of the present-day strain is transferred towards the frontal subduction thrust rather than towards the inner Makran thrusts. In order to complement this new GPS velocity field with spatially dense measurements, we processed a set of ERS radar images by the radar interferometry (InSAR) technique. We used both a ’stacking’ and a ’persistant-scatterers’ approach to differentiate the ground deformation signal which spatial gradient is expected to be very low, from the atmospheric signal. Results from these interferograms appear to be relatively in agreement with the GPS-determined strain distribution. Nevertheless, they confirm the absence of any superficial creep behaviour since no sharp discontinuity on interferometric phase can be noted on any interferogram. Finally, we use a purely kinematic ’block model’ inversion process to calculate slip rates and locking depths for each fault system from our GPS measurements. These models suggest that the relative quiescence over the last 200 yr has certainly produced a slip deficit as high as 2 m. So, we may wonder if the MZP fault system is not late in the interseismic phase of its earthquake cycle.

Voir la notice complète sur HAL

Actualités