The Plant DNA Damage Response : Signaling Pathways Leading to Growth Inhibition and Putative Role in Response to Stress Conditions Article - Mai 2019

Maher-Un Nisa, Ying Huang, Moussa Benhamed, Cécile Raynaud

Maher-Un Nisa, Ying Huang, Moussa Benhamed, Cécile Raynaud, « The Plant DNA Damage Response : Signaling Pathways Leading to Growth Inhibition and Putative Role in Response to Stress Conditions  », Frontiers in Plant Science, mai 2019. ISSN 1664-462X

Abstract

Maintenance of genome integrity is a key issue for all living organisms. Cells are constantly exposed to DNA damage due to replication or transcription, cellular metabolic activities leading to the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) or even exposure to DNA damaging agents such as UV light. However, genomes remain extremely stable, thanks to the permanent repair of DNA lesions. One key mechanism contributing to genome stability is the DNA Damage Response (DDR) that activates DNA repair pathways, and in the case of proliferating cells, stops cell division until DNA repair is complete. The signaling mechanisms of the DDR are quite well conserved between organisms including in plants where they have been investigated into detail over the past 20 years. In this review we summarize the acquired knowledge and recent advances regarding the DDR control of cell cycle progression. Studying the plant DDR is particularly interesting because of their mode of development and lifestyle. Indeed, plants develop largely post-embryonically, and form new organs through the activity of meristems in which cells retain the ability to proliferate. In addition, they are sessile organisms that are permanently exposed to adverse conditions that could potentially induce DNA damage in all cell types including meristems. In the second part of the review we discuss the recent findings connecting the plant DDR to responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

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